Posts tagged ‘2011’

2011 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,300 times in 2011. If it were a cable car, it would take about 38 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

31 December 2011 at 9:31PM Leave a comment

NotHire: How to Sabotage Your Recruiting Efforts in Six Easy Steps

Somehow, your humble author missed this posting on Brenden Wright’s blog when it came out in 2009. But, since you know that the NotJobs motto is “Better Late than Never”, we’re pleased to offer this excerpt from Brenden’s work. The title is “How to Sabotage Your Recruiting Efforts in Six Easy Steps“, so Wright covers six things that managers do to ruin their chance of hiring the best (or hiring anyone.) You’ll need to see the article for the details, but here are the six sabotages:

Step #1: Beat up your recruiters about the lack of “qualified” candidates and then decline candidates based on your “gut” feeling about the resume.
Step #2: Once you finally find someone that passes the “fit” test and set up an interview, don’t make yourself available to interview. Pride goes before the fall.
Step #3: Be late for your scheduled interview time. Or better yet, just don’t even show up.
Step #4: Don’t prepare for your interview. After all, you have more important things to do – like the work of the employee you are trying to hire.
Step #5: Ask stupid questions.
Step #6: Don’t make a decision.

Kill me now.

Agreed.

See the whole post for a great read.

19 December 2011 at 1:48AM Leave a comment

Catbert on writing a job posting

Dilbert.com
Note that Catbert is in HR, not in Recruiting…

17 October 2011 at 12:10AM Leave a comment

“Cost of Livin'” is an interview

Ronnie Dunn (formerly of the country duo Brooks and Dunn) released his “Cost of Livin'” in June, and it has been getting some airplay again in Denver. The song is one side of an interview – the candidate, an out-of-work Army veteran, is applying for a job. Dunn has captured something that seems extra real and urgent given the state of our economy.  His video makes it even more real:

Everything to know about me
Is written on this page
The number you can reach me
My social and my age
Yes, I served in the Army
It’s where I learned to shoot
Eighteen months in the desert
Pourin’ sand out of my boots.
No, I’ve never been convicted of a crime
I could start this job at any time.

I got a strong back,
steel toes
I rarely call in sick
A good truck
What I don’t know, I catch on real quick
I work weekends if I have to
Nights and holidays
Give you 40 and then some
Whatever it takes.
Three dollars and change at the pump,
Cost of livin’s high and goin’ up.

I put Robert down as a reference
He’s known me all my life
We attend the same church
He introduced me to my wife
Gave my last job everything
Before it headed south
Took the shoes off of my children’s feet
The food out of their mouths
Yesterday my folks offered to help
But they’re barely getting by themselves

I’m sure a hundred others have applied
Rumor has it you’re only takin’ five

Mr. Dunn and his co-author Mr. Coleman have a good one here.

13 October 2011 at 12:33AM Leave a comment

BI: LOL Real Job Ads

Business Insider has a feature on “10 Real Job Ads That Made Us Laugh Out Loud.” The BI editors have picked some good examples of the kind of creativity that gets noticed.

Hiring Bus Drivers:

Hiring Computer Engineers:

Not all their examples are of genius work. One ad shows how narrow the line between creative and insane is:

See the whole article here:
http://www.businessinsider.com/funny-job-ads-2011-4

12 October 2011 at 1:54AM Leave a comment

The Origin of Job Interviews

From the Armstrong and Miller Show:

Interview question: “Where you see yourself in fifty moons time?”
Interview answer: “Hunting… maybe gathering.”

It going to be long day people!

Thanks to Max for the tip!

27 May 2011 at 12:10AM Leave a comment

How NOT to get a job at a busy hospital

Over at the Being Veruca blog, healthcare professional/respiratory therapist Mommy A has a description of how a desperate job seeker interrupted her lifesaving work to ask pointless questions.This leads to her posting on How Not to Get a Job.

First, let her set the scene:

It is 3 AM. I have been busy as all hell because A) people keep trying to die in the hospital and we have had more codes than I thought possible in one shift. And I have the main ICU.

Tip: Don’t call the busy ICU floor in the middle of the night if you’re looking for a job. The conversation could go like this:


Moron:”How many patients do you have? Right. now. How many units of the hospital are you covering? And how many therapists do you have there tonight?”

Me: “Well, we have 4, which is standard at night. I have the MICU, and I am covering all of the patients in that unit. There are 10 ventilators running up there right now and…..”

Moron: “OH MY GOD! Do they always work you like that??? I heard they did. I work at XXXXX now and I only have 2 treatments to give before 8 in the morning. That’s what I’m used to. I don’t like to work a lot. Or very hard. Ewwww. And a ventilator? I hate running vents. I haven’t run a vent in 10 years.”

Me: “Ummmm, we are usually pretty busy here. And since there are only 4 therapists in house at night, all of us may be asked to handle a vent or an intubation, even if we aren’t assigned to an ICU…” (Okay, now I think I may be being punk’d. Where’s Ashton?)

Moron: “Whatever, I guess I can try it. Where do I fill out an application?”

I had to give her the website where she can apply online. And I had to tell my boss this morning that if anyone calls who works at that hospital, to please not hire them. Who? Who really tries to get a job like that? Especially in our current day where even healthcare professionals are having difficulties finding jobs. I mean, when I applied for my current position, I called. But when I called, I spoke with the director of my department and simply asked, in a polite tone, if they had any available positions for a registered therapist. He asked me a few questions about my experience, and before I had even completed an application, HR had called me to schedule an interview. I actually completed the application and submitted my resume at my interview. But I was polite. And professional. And was eager to work. And motivated. Really.


Notice Mommy A’s reaction: She told her boss not to hire. Her call is a better model for getting a job in a busy hospital.

24 May 2011 at 10:39PM Leave a comment

NotJobs: I’m Clearly the Best Candidate!

Suzanna Lucas, The Evil HR Lady, is one of my favorites. Earlier, she wrote the perfect takedown of an applicant with an entitlement attitude: I’m Clearly the Best Candidate–So Why Am I Not Getting the Job?

To start the discussion, the applicant ponders:

I heard that 85% of the time it’s not the most qualified candidate that gets the job.  I’m still searching for that 15% job.

I’m doing something wrong in the interviews.  I’ve been a finalist a few times now but not gotten the job.  Sadly, I used to be good at interviewing.

Anyways, if nothing else you could tell me a couple of great subject lines to use.

The Evil HR Lady responds:

A great couple of lines will not get you a job.  Neither will the idea that you’re not getting the job because hiring managers hire the less qualified person 85% of the time.  And, if there’s ever been a made up statistic, that’s one of them.

To be honest, as long as no one is lying on their resume (and that is a big caveat), that by the time you’ve made it through the resume screen and the phone screen, all candidates being interviewed could do the job and are qualified.  It’s doubtful any recruiter or hiring manager is saying, “Gee I need an accountant who is experienced in Hedge funds.  So, let’s bring in this guy who has experience and 3 other people who don’t have a clue about that area!”  Nope.  All the people interviewing will have the necessary experience.

You said you used to be good at interviewing, but now you are not.  May I gently suggest that you probably have never been spectacularly good at interviewing, but have been in situations where there were fewer qualified candidates to choose from.

It’s the market…

See the Evil HR Lady’s article here:
http://www.bnet.com/blog/evil-hr-lady/i-8217m-clearly-the-best-candidate-8211so-why-am-i-not-getting-the-job/1032

4 May 2011 at 12:10AM Leave a comment

How NOT to help someone get a job: Capes!

If you had $73,000 of taxpayer money to spend on helping the jobless, would you spend it on superhero capes and an evil villain? Workforce Central Florida (WFCF) tried it, and watched the program blow up on them. Yahoo News had the details:


Job center blasted for giving

capes to unemployed

ORLANDO, Fla. – Florida officials are investigating an unemployment agency that spent public money to give 6,000 superhero capes to the jobless.

Workforce Central Florida spent more than $14,000 on the red capes as part of its “Cape-A-Bility Challenge” public relations campaign. The campaign featured a cartoon character, “Dr. Evil Unemployment,” who needs to be vanquished.

Florida’s unemployment agency director asked Monday for an investigation of the regional operation’s spending after the Orlando Sentinel published a story about the program. State director Cynthia Lorenzo said the spending appeared to be “insensitive and wasteful.”

Workforce Central Florida Director Gary J. Earl defends the program, saying it is part of a greater effort to connect with the community. The agency says it served 210,000 people during its last fiscal year, placing nearly 59,000 in jobs.


The Orlando Sentinel provides more details about this program:

The budget for the campaign was $73,000, with more than $14,000 being spent on capes and almost $2,300 on the “Dr. Evil” figures. Although the agency has said that was all public money, Vice President Kimberly Sullivan on Wednesday suggested the capes were bought using cash from a non-public account. She provided no details.

Agency officials had portrayed the campaign as a fun, unusual way to engage the public. Many of Central Florida’s 116,000 unemployed saw it as juvenile or, worse yet, insulting.

Many of Florida’s unemployed let Workforce Central Florida know their feelings. The result was in this message, posted on the WFCF web page last Wednesday:

ORLANDO, Fla. – WORKFORCE CENTRAL FLORIDA has listened to the public, and will be withdrawing our admittedly out-of-the-box creative campaign, “Cape-A-Bility Challenge” later today.

Seems that Workforce Central Florida forgot about E.Mode’s First Law:

25 April 2011 at 12:42AM Leave a comment

Remember: Beware the Receptionist Test

The most popular post on this blog is one from 2008 about how candidates fail the Receptionist Test. It happens all the time.

The Receptionist Test is an unexpected assessment of how the candidate deals with ordinary staff during the interview. It is effective because it is unexpected. The key point to remember about the Receptionist Test is:

…your interview starts as soon as you enter the building. Companies can (and will) use every means to make sure that  you are the best qualified person for the role.

On his great blog about leadership, thoughtLEADERS, Mike Figliuolo confirms a time when a “sure thing” candidate failed the Receptionist Test:


When I was a consultant, we regularly interviewed a slew of candidates on Fridays. The first person they met was the receptionist. From there, they’d interview with eight or nine of us and we’d hold a “consensus meeting” at the end of the day to determine if we were going to make a job offer.

One exceptional candidate (let’s call him “Bill”) did an amazing job in all eight of his interviews. He was brilliant, charming, and energetic. All of us were excited about him as we entered the consensus meeting. Some of us were already fighting over who would get him on their team first. As we discussed his glowing performance, it was abundantly clear we’d be making him an offer. We prepared to close the discussion and asked “Does anyone else have anything to offer on Bill?”

“I do.”

“Go ahead.” said the meeting moderator.

“When he came in, I was on the phone. He tapped his pen impatiently on my desk indicating I should stop talking on the phone and help him. I asked my caller, who happened to be the office director, to wait a moment. The conversation then went like this:”

“Can I help you?”

“Yeah. I’m here to interview. Don’t you know who I am?”

“I’m sorry sir. I don’t.”

“Geez. Look in your paperwork. Bill. Bill Farfegnugen. Isn’t it your job to receive guests properly?”

“Yes. Please have a seat. They’ll be with you shortly.”

“Aren’t you going to take my coat and get me a cup of coffee?”

“Sure. I’d be happy to. Cream and sugar?”

“Yeah.”

“After I got him his coffee, I showed him to his first interview. I’m sorry but I simply can’t see this guy in front of our clients. I can’t recall the last time someone was that rude to me.”

Needless to say, Bill didn’t get a job offer. He probably wonders why not to this very day because he knew he smoked his interviews. Hey Bill – news flash – she’s not just a receptionist… Her name is Lois and she takes really good care of the people around her. Had you done the same, you might have gotten the job.


Read the entire posting here:
http://thoughtleadersllc.blogspot.com/2007/12/his-name-is-angel.html
Also – see the original Receptionist Test post:
https://notjobs.wordpress.com/2008/11/14/tip-beware-the-receptionist-test/

23 April 2011 at 12:29PM 1 comment

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My Core Ideas

1. "I can't tell you the best way to get a job - because there is no one best way. After 21 years of recruiting, I CAN share things I've seen candidates do to guarantee they DIDN'T get the job."

2. "Most companies don't realize how their recruiting process impacts their candidate pool, and their business. Attention to simple things will result in big improvements."

About the Author

Troy Bettinger, SPHR is a Denver Recruiter, Public Speaker, HR Metrics Analyst and Human Resources Leader who has been recruiting in corporate and municipal environments since 1991.

He specializes in the complete hiring process: defining, sourcing, recruiting, testing, interviewing, offering and orienting new hires. He's also well versed in strategic human resources, college recruiting, diversity recruiting, AAP, EEO, ATS integration, recruiting metrics, social media, recruiting leadership, training and employment branding.

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